From the Editor

laurie-editor

Long before Kindles and iPads and on-line book stores, there were libraries.  When I was a little girl our library was housed in an old bank building on the town square. The children’s books were just inside the door and it was there that I discovered a small book called The Dolls’ Christmas. The soft illustrations of the charming old dolls appealed to me and the size of the book was perfect for small hands.  Later I learned that Tasha Tudor had written not only this book but many others, including another doll story – A is for Annabelle.  And quite a bit later I decided to write a note to Tasha to tell her how much her books meant to me.  Thus began a correspondence between us that lasted for several years.

This issue of Doll News gradually grew into a theme issue.  Many of the articles pay tribute to different facets of Tasha’s fascinating life, especially her life as it pertained to dolls.  Special guest author, John Hare of Cellar Door Books shares his wealth of knowledge on the topic of Tasha’s dolls and art.  Becky Ourant regales us with Part 2 of her article, Early Jumeau Bébés. We will meet a special Hitty doll with a penchant for penning letters. Mary Senko relates the story behind the beautiful doll on this issue’s cover, Annabelle.  Kathy Monier has designed a well-dressed paper doll to accompany Mary’s creatively photographed tale.  We take a peek at a special doll-themed exhibit presented by the Tasha Tudor Museum last year, Unending Delight. We will be introduced to a French Fashion doll named Lavinia Loring whose wardrobe was sewn by Tasha Tudor. Ann Leis interviews doll-maker Christine Crocker, as well as Marjorie Tudor, Tasha Tudor’s daughter-in-law.  Jill Kaar Hanson pens her passion for Wendy Lawton’s delightfully detailed dolls.  AnneLise Wilhelmsen offers us a glimpse into Tasha’s fondness for costumes from the 1800s, translating them into tiny garments to fit a 6-1/2-inch doll.  Gael Schults has drawn a lovely paper doll to complement the pattern pages. Nicki Burley proudly presents the ladies in the on-line Bleuette Sewing Club who took the challenge to create a Tudor-inspired Annabelle doll of their own.

We will pay a rare visit to Elizabeth Ann Coleman’s historical home when she graciously opened her doors to visitors during last summer’s convention in Washington, D.C., and we will enjoy Part 2 of the Competitive Exhibits and Special Exhibits that made our 2013 convention so memorable.

May this special issue of Doll News inspire you to follow your bliss.

Laurie