Fall 2012 The Authors

Black in Fashion

by Ian Price

Ian Price‘s day job is running Price Watkins Media, a graphic design consultancy in San Francisco, with a sideline in writing and photography. He’s especially interested in mid-20th century collecting but is not averse to adding anything shiny, bright, and new.

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Barbie, her more fragile side…

by Bradley Justice

Former Region 8 Director for UFDC, and Curator for the Doll and Miniature Museum of High Point, North Carolina, Bradley Justice has devoted most of his adult life to his hobby. Although a lover of antique French fashion dolls and cloth dolls from his home state of North Carolina, he has recently returned to his original passion, the Barbie doll. Bradley has curated three museum exhibits with Barbie as the subject, as well as written and presented many programs on the subject. A founding member of the Queen Anne’s Revenge Doll Club, Bradley is a member of three additional UFDC doll clubs and currently devotes much of his time to his store in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, The Swell Doll Shop, where he deals in vintage and modern dolls and teaches workshops on doll costuming. Bradley was the recipient of the 2008 UFDC Award of Excellence for the Display of Dolls.

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“Mein Liebling,” The successful life of a German doll-face turned into a character

by Samy Odin

Samy Odin was born in Torre Pellice, Italy, in 1965. He holds masters degrees in French Language and Literature from the University of Turin and the University of Lyon, and is the founder and present owner and director of the Mus̩e de la Poup̩e-Paris. Samy is the author of several books about antique dolls, as well as articles in doll magazines such as Doll News, Antique Doll Collector, Doll Reader, Geppetto, Gildebrief, La Bacchetta Magica, Collections and Ours et Poup̩es.

Samy has been a member of UFDC since 1994 and has attended national conventions since 1999, volunteering as a program presenter, giving seminars and dynamic dialogues, setting up special exhibits, contributing a souvenir journal in 2003, running a sales table both in the salesroom and at Publisher’s Preview, and speaking for special meal events. In addition, Samy has been judging in the antique competitive exhibits since 2001. He received a UFDC Award of Excellence in 2010. Presently, Samy is running for regional director of Region 16 for a 2011-2014 term.

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Rose Percy in Milwaukee

by Jill Karr Hanson

My name is Jill Kaar Hanson and I started collecting dolls when I was four years old. I am married to Jerry Hanson and we are both members of the Lake County Doll Collectors of Illinois. The club is 26 years old and I am a Charter member and am currently Club President.

Jerry and I work as a team creating Doll Programs and writing articles.  I have produced three programs for UFDC, two of which took the top prize for the year they were entered at convention.

I have attended about 20 National Conventions and served as a monitor, hostess, judge, speaker and presented Special Exhibits.  Jerry and I are currently serving as Helper Room Chairmen.  I served as Region 10 Director from 2005 to 2008.

We live in Lindenhurst, Illinois and I work as a Senior Tax Advisor and Instructor for H&R Block.

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Friedericy Dolls: A Mother-Daughter Story

by Ann Leis

Ann M. Leis grew up in Fulton, New York and has loved dolls most of her life. As a child, her best Christmas ever was receiving the Barbie Dream house. She is a member of the 1st Houston Doll club and is an avid collector of both antique and modern dolls.

Over the years, Ann has volunteered for a variety of school and civic organizations.

She was President for both high school Band and Choir Booster clubs and held numerous roles within each group.  Presently, Ann enjoys volunteering at her consignment shop for the Charity Guild of Catholic Women.

Ann holds a B.S.N in Nursing from Arizona State University and has worked as a surgical, school and recovery room nurse. She does a lot of traveling to help her family and likes to cook, Quilt and read. Ann enjoys Jazzercise, Yoga, Swimming and Tennis and has even learned to like Football.  Ann had three awesome kids pursuing goals in Marketing, Musical Theater and Engineering and has a wonderful husband who goes along with all of her crazy ideas. She is thrilled to be a free lance writer for Doll News and wants to thank Laurie and Nina for all their encouragement and support.

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Dolls: Collections. Stories. Tradition.

by Ian Price

Ian Price‘s day job is running Price Watkins Media, a graphic design consultancy in San Francisco, with a sideline in writing and photography. He’s especially interested in mid-20th century collecting but is not averse to adding anything shiny, bright, and new.

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The Magic and Merriment of Prim Pumpkin

by Jennifer Hepler-Takens

Potion bottles, the sound of bat wings fluttering by on a crisp Michigan night, the poetry of pumpkins sitting together sipping tea or sharing nip of absinthe…. These are the things of magic and when brewed together they create something quite unique.

The work of Jennifer Hepler-Takens is a bit like a marriage of vintage embellishment and Merry Halloween. She creates one of a kind Pumpkin dolls in her Battle Creek, Michigan studio.  Jennifer’s pumpkin dolls have been featured in national publications and are coveted by collectors throughout Europe and the United States.

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Up in Bernard’s Attic: A Trove of Lipfert “Originals”

by Don Jensen

A frequent contributor to DOLL NEWS, Don Jensen is a historian, author of two doll reference volumes and editor of a third, a freelance magazine writer and columnist for more than 40 years, a former radio broadcaster, a newspaper reporter and editor for more than 30 years, now retired. His articles have appeared in doll magazines for 20 years, including DOLL READER, ANTIQUE DOLL COLLECTOR and others. He is, with his wife and partner, Arlene, co-recipient of the UFDC 1998 Award of Merit for Contributions to Doll News for their service as DOLL NEWS Assistant Editors-Modern. He is the recipient of the “Cathy Lifetime Achievement Award” from Modern Doll Collectors. With Arlene, they write a regular column, DOLL TALK in DOLL COLLECTOR MAGAZINE They have served the UFDC convention as co-chairs of the Modern Competitive Exhibits for four years, and as co-chairs of the Modern Highlight tours for two terms, and he has been chairman of the UFDC Nominating Committee. Don is a modern doll judge at UFDC nationals and has served as chief judge in UFDC regional competition. He has presented many programs and seminars at UFDC national and regional events. His special interest and expertise is in American dolls from 1900, especially Horsman and Effanbee, plus advertising, celebrity and cartoon character types.

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National Doll and Toy Collectors Club of New York City Celebrates! 75th Anniversary Gala

by Denise Buese

Denise Buese’s introduction to antique dolls occurred in 1975, when her grandmother presented her with a well-loved A.M. 390, and that was all it took to be hooked. When Denise stopped playing with dolls at the age of 12, she began sewing clothes for her sister’s Barbies, which is really still playing.

Denise has been a member of Verdugo Hills Doll Club since 1992, and has held the position of treasurer for two terms. After earning a BSN in nursing, she worked in NICU and OR before stopping to raise a family of two boys, one of whom is now in college and the other in high school. Happily, she is now freer to indulge her love of sewing for dolls, and is honing her skills at pattern making. Denise’s collection is comprised of mostly French bebes and poupees, but she is interested in learning about other types. In her spare time, Denise enjoys studying the Tudor age and it’s fascinating characters, and when she isn’t sewing, you can usually find her entrenched in a good book.

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Magic, Mystery, and Mary Frances: 100 Years of Enchanted Sewing Lessons

by Nicki Burley

Once upon a time, there was a small brown-eyed girl with curly brown hair, who certainly looked ordinary…but inside, she KNEW she was a princess. She believed with all her heart that you could always tell a princess by her clothing, so she decided to wear a long dress to kindergarten every day. Her mother was relieved that the princess was willing to go to school at all, so when she marched out the door carrying a lunch bag and backpack and wearing yet another long cotton print nightgown, her mother just smiled and waved.

When the little girl learned to read and write, a new world of magic appeared. There were more stories in the world than her father could read in a hundred nights! She told stories to her patient dog, and she told them to her dolls. Though she eventually stopped wearing nightgowns to school, she never outgrew her love of books or dolls. She spent many blissful weekends at the library, reading all kinds of books: novels and poems, and books on dolls, costume, old houses, miniatures, history, art, or needlework. One book on a subject always opened the door to many more.

Now that she is all grown up, Nicki Burley and her husband find themselves in a cozy home about 5 miles from where they grew up, happily surrounded by five children, some cats and birds, lots and lots of books, and a growing collection of dolls. Her youngest two children are homeschooled, and she teaches English literature part-time. An early pen name she invented, “Jessica Rose Wren,” has recently led to the name of her business, Rose & Wren, which offers finely detailed handmade doll clothing. You can find her on the web at www.zhibit.biz/roseandwren.

Joining UFDC just a few years ago led to the discovery of yet another magic world: the world of friendship through dolls. Nicki has met many of her early “doll heroes,” and has attended both local and national events. After taking her daughters along to help at several events, she realized how much children would enjoy learning more about dolls and having events geared just for them. In her own region, she plans to help coordinate several young collector events this year. She is thrilled to be writing again, but she is especially excited to share what she knows and what she loves with children. All children have stories in their hearts, and need dolls with whom to share them.